What's new

Sterling With Olds 455 Cubic Inch Engine and Transmission

Russ

New member
Based on this entire thread, I think there's a very good chance that THIS is your car(!) It's from a brochure introducing the Sterling GT and my notes say it's from 1984. Fascinating.

View attachment 9716

View attachment 9717

Obviously the wheels, new doors, and some other stuff is different, but you said those are things you changed.

But, see... In the bigger story, it has bothered me for years that the photos of the few GTs we know about show different lower side scoops than the car that was pictured in that brochure. That's been so very difficult to reconcile. It's almost like the car in the brochure never actually was reproduced but obviously contributed 99% to the Sterling GT that was actually produced.

The lower side scoop for the car in that brochure -- and your car, which we now think are the same car -- looks like lower scoop from the original Sterling (and Sovran for that matter.)

In the next two photos -- which are definitely of actual Sterling GTs -- Note how the lower side scoop LOOKS like it's higher on the body. It's not. It's an optical illusion from the fact that they made the rocker panel under the scoop a little taller to help hide the lowered floorboards.

View attachment 9718

View attachment 9719

You might have solved the mystery of that car from the brochure. (I never would have bet on that ever being solved.) Ha!

Based on this entire thread, I think there's a very good chance that THIS is your car(!) It's from a brochure introducing the Sterling GT and my notes say it's from 1984. Fascinating.

View attachment 9716

View attachment 9717

Obviously the wheels, new doors, and some other stuff is different, but you said those are things you changed.

But, see... In the bigger story, it has bothered me for years that the photos of the few GTs we know about show different lower side scoops than the car that was pictured in that brochure. That's been so very difficult to reconcile. It's almost like the car in the brochure never actually was reproduced but obviously contributed 99% to the Sterling GT that was actually produced.

The lower side scoop for the car in that brochure -- and your car, which we now think are the same car -- looks like lower scoop from the original Sterling (and Sovran for that matter.)

In the next two photos -- which are definitely of actual Sterling GTs -- Note how the lower side scoop LOOKS like it's higher on the body. It's not. It's an optical illusion from the fact that they made the rocker panel under the scoop a little taller to help hide the lowered floorboards.

View attachment 9718

View attachment 9719

You might have solved the mystery of that car from the brochure. (I never would have bet on that ever being solved.) Ha!
Wow , the car in the brochure is my car ... It had red gelcoat and a cream colored interior when I got it . The first owner had a Mazda RX7 rotary engine in it which I didn't like [it sounded like an outboard motor ] so I pulled it out and upgraded .
 

Nic

Active member
Hi Russ - Thanks for sharing your car. It's amazing that after all these years we, the community, are still finding fascinating examples. Out of curiosity, where are you in the world?
 

Russ

New member
Hi Russ - Thanks for sharing your car. It's amazing that after all these years we, the community, are still finding fascinating examples. Out of curiosity, where are you in the world?
HI , I live in California near Fresno .
 

sector

Member
Looks like you went to the other side of the spectrum by switching from the rotary, low torque but very light engine to 455 beast with hight torque and very heavy cast iron block.
Just curious, what made you choose that setup over any other more compact front will drive setup? Seems like there are plenty of other high power FWD options available.
 

Russ

New member
I chose the big block V8 engine back in the 80's before all the high powered , low weight , front wheel drive cars started to appear . The giant Toronado engine / trans seemed like the ultimate powerplant to stuff into the back of a Sterling .
 
Top