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Sterling #130 (aka American V8 ~ Chapter 2)

nbb350

Member
four more hours of sanding on Sunday...and I can still feel it today!
3M5ThWa.jpg


and this is what happens to your fingernails after four hours of sanding with 1000 grit...notice the shape... lol
another half hour and I think that pinky would have started bleeding...
tjmavYN.jpg
 

nbb350

Member
As of yesterday the 2000 grit sanding is done...and I have no fingerprints/skin left on the fingertips of my right hand! and that pinky finger nail is now sanded down to the point of bleeding. I'm taking the rest of the week off in order to let my skin and nails grow back! lol

I also realized that the 7" foam buffing wheel isn't going to fit everywhere - like in the top and side air vents. so I ordered some "cotton buffing cones" off Amazon to use with the 3M white/black buffing/polishing compound.
 

nbb350

Member
First off, those cotton buffing cones were WAY too dense for buffing paint. I'll save those for buffing the aluminum slots... Instead I went out and bought a Mother's Mini Powerball. it was a PERFECT FIT inside the air vent holes over the rear wheels! also came in handy for buffing the lower air vents, the corners of the headlight buckets, and some other inside corners.

I spent 5 hours on Memorial Day in 70F weather buffing the 3M white compound and another 5 hours today in 97F weather buffing the 3M black compound. Oh she's shiny now! (yes, I buff inside out of the sun...but the garage door is still open, so the hot air blows right inside...ugh)

190 hours in paint prep, spraying, cleanup, sanding, & buffing. Wow...that works out to about $7600 in labor @ $40/hour (my time value as a non-professional). And that's spread out over TEN MONTHS! lol
$1200 in paint & primer
$520 in equipment that I now own (DeVilbiss gun, folding work stands, foam sanding blocks, face mask)
$480 in consumable materials (sandpaper, thinner, rags, air filters, tape, gloves, bunnysuit)

So...$2200 out of pocket and another $7600 in labor = $9800. Still cheaper than the cheapest quote I got from a pro body shop last summer. And that shop said they'd "work on it over the winter as they had time". So it may not have been done any quicker!
 
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nbb350

Member
Also, when I was working out there Monday I got to thinking....my car hasn't been on the road since at least 2005 (per the license tabs on the plates when I bought it), so I figuerd the shock absorbers would most likely be shot. So, without looking at the car, I ordered 4 new shocks off RockAuto. They showed up today, 3 days early! yay! but wait...they don't look like the shocks that are actually on the car!

The ones I bought were the popular Gabriel OEM quality:
82005__ra_p.jpg


But what is on my car (front and rear) look more like these:
AC513001B_1__ra_p.jpg


Oops. Did I screw up? haven't opened the new shock boxes yet...might still be able to return them (i pay shipping).
 

ratrog64

Active member
I have found that on my past 2 builds that the coil over shocks were necessary in the front. The oil filled shocks were just too soft and allowed my tires to rub at times in turns. The coil over shocks definitely make for a more harsh ride however. My next car I'm going to try a set of gas shocks up front since I already have a set I can try.
 

nbb350

Member
So, what I actually need may be entirely dependent on wheel/tire size combo then. All I have now are some old RWL rollers that came with the aluminum slots i bought.

Ratrog: What size tires/wheels did you have when you experienced rubbing?
 

ratrog64

Active member
Picked up my new tires today 245 60 15 rear and 205 60 15 front. Rear will be mounted on 8" rims and fronts on 7".

From my Builders Journal #114
 

vpogv

Member
I have found that on my past 2 builds that the coil over shocks were necessary in the front. The oil filled shocks were just too soft and allowed my tires to rub at times in turns. The coil over shocks definitely make for a more harsh ride however. My next car I'm going to try a set of gas shocks up front since I already have a set I can try.
I am curious what you had for your front torsion set up when it was too soft with the oil shocks - did you have any of the bars removed?
 

letterman7

Honorary Admin
Those are the aftermarket VW coil-overs, available at any retailer like CB or CIP1. Like Brett, I found that the stock oil filled shocks wouldn't work either - fenders would rub. My guess is that with the body sitting lower than a stock Beetle fender, the shocks didn't have enough "clearance". So, I changed to the coil overs as well. I didn't mind the slightly rougher ride.
 

nbb350

Member
dammit...looks like i'll be paying return shipping...i should have walked out to the shop and looked at the shocks before ordering them...
 

nbb350

Member
I returned the factory-style shocks and will buy the coil-over shocks when my store credit shows up. In the meantime I pulled the old shocks off to measure them against what the website says are the specs for the new shocks - might as well check and order the right size this time! The shocks themselves seem to work fine (no collapsed cylinders), but the rubber bushings are completely crumbling. Time for new shocks anyways.

Friday and Saturday I worked on rebuilding the fuel system. All the lines were 15+ years old and some of them appeared to be re-used from the original VW donor car! those hoses just cracked apart when I removed them. As I was re-routing the fuel lines, I was reaching for the line from the bottom of the tank when it just pulled off. not good. well, a closer look made it obvious WHY it could just pull off - the factory VW fuel tank drain fitting is SMOOTH - no barb or lip to retain a hose. Well, an extra brass fitting and some solder fixed that!

Then I had to run to a couple different stores to find a new Neoprene washer to go between the tank and flange. I picked that up last night on my way to the first local car show of the season. Yay! I missed the "roll in" nights that were absent last summer. No annual "Back to the Fifties" car show (~12,000+ cars) here this summer either. (Our Glorious Supreme Leader and his Attorney General Commander repealed their mandates a couple days after the Go-NoGo deadline.)

PXL_20210612_192337055.jpg
PXL_20210612_214418980.jpg
 

nbb350

Member
started wiring up the dash last night. got the fuel sender adapter installed and decided to program it; to do that, I need to know the sender range. so i grabbed my DMM and hooked it up to the fuel sender in the tank... 140...0......160.....180......100......160......70...... WTH?!? I guess that sender is crap. great...it's UNDER the HVAC box. gotta pull that out. tried to shift the fuel tank, but it hits the cutout in the body. sigh...not sure if i'm making progress or not with all the re-work i seem to be doing... but at least now I'll know which factory pre-programmed setting to use on the fuel sender adapter...
 

farfegnubbin

Site Owner
Staff member
You’re making progress. My dad has a theory that, on projects like these, most things need to be reworked at least two or three times. He feels that’s built into the fabric of a project and therefore taking something back off let’s you check off that box on the cosmic list of things that were inevitable even though you didn’t previously know they were inevitable. So…congrats on good progress! 🙂
 
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